Herself's Artificial Intelligence

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Spam bots advance to stealing web 2.0 identitities




Porn is, as always, leading the internet in new techniques, not just video now, but dataming as well. A porn company in Canada, SlickPay aka Istra Holdings sent out bots to collect information about Facebook users and then sent them porn spam. Facebook is claiming identities were stolen from it.

So is it identity theft if a bot steals your data from a company? What if that bot starts impersonating you online? Can one computer steal from another? And is your online id and the data that goes with it yours, the company who collects the data’s, or not anyones? Not much of interest technology wise here but it brings up lots of interesting legal issues.

The issue of data security on the worldwide web has reared its ugly head yet again. Yet another lawsuit has been filed against another errant company trying to device innovative ways of luring traffic to its website. This time its Facebook, the popular social networking website that has sued Istra Holdings, a Canadian company, and 17 other persons for creating bots that stole personal data of Facebook users. Bots, by the way, are software applications in which an automated script fetches, analyses and files information from web servers at many times the speed of man (Thank you Wiki!).
[read more Who stole my identity?]

Related:
Facebooks disabled my account – Scobleizer
Phishing kits take advantage of novice fraudsters

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